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Dress Code for Female Teachers in Thailand




Since I am a female teacher, I must wear a skirt to work every day. Now, if you’re a feisty feminist like myself, you probably do not fancy this at all. That being said, I have gotten used to it. Although the dress code certainly isn’t my favourite thing about teaching in Thailand, I do recommend the experience overall, despite that.
To help you understand what women can and cannot wear while teaching in Thailand, I will show you some of the outfits I wear to the school. However, please remember that each school will be different. I have a feeling my school is a bit more lenient because we are in a rural area. As you can see, I wore almost the same thing every day during the year of mourning.

English teacher in Thailand wearing a long-sleeved blue button-up shirt and a shin-length black skirt.
English teacher in Thailand wearing a long-sleeved blue button-up shirt and a shin-length black skirt.

If you look closely you can see that I am wearing suspenders, a long-sleeved, light blue button-up, a long, black A-line skirt with single chevron-stripes and pleather knee-high motorcycle boots. Nobody has said anything about the boots, but I can’t guarantee that they’ll be allowed at your school. I usually only wear them when I’m driving the motorbike around anyway. However, they are nice on those rainy, cold days as well.
What to wear as an ESL teacher in Thailand to dress appropriately for the dress code for women.

English teacher in Thailand wearing a long-sleeved blue button-up shirt and a shin-length black skirt.
In the next photo, with Peaches the cat, I am wearing the MediaKids-provided shirt with a long, black velveteen Zara A-line skirt. However, you might notice that the shirt has been knotted in the front. I believe we are required to wear the shirt tucked in; however, nobody commented on it, so the rules may be different at different schools. You may have also noticed that I am wearing sandals. I see the Thai teachers wearing strappy shoes, sandals and even occassionally flipflops at my school, so I think they’re pretty liberal with their footwear policies. HOWEVER, I must once again stress the fact that this is technically against the rules, so if you’re the kind of person who “can get away with things”, you may want to try it. Otherwise, if you’ve received comments about breaking the dress code before and you don’t see anybody else doing it, I recommend erring on the side of caution and wearing a closed-toe shoe. I usually wear my black canvas Tom’s, which are slip-on shoes sturdy enough to for everyday use. Teachers are permitted to wear more casual clothes and shoes on “sports days” when classes are cancelled.

modest attire to dress conservatively in Thailand as an ESL teacher
Me with a poster I made for the ESL classroom,
dressed conservatively in a company-provided
white button-up with 3/4 sleeves and a black knee-length skirt.
In the third photo, I’m wearing the MediKids provided shirt, with yet another (it’s different, I promise!) long, black skirt. A long-sleeved white blouse with a long, black skirt is a sure hit. You can never go wrong with this combination, as it should meet the dress code for any Thai public school. I am also wearing the mandatory black mourning ribbon. If you don’t know why the country was in mourning, I suggest you look it up, along with the term lèse-majesté and the proper (legally required) etiquette surrounding the monarchy.
The official mourning period is over and the Thai people, as well as the foreign teachers are now officially allowed to wear colours other than black and white (my blue shirt may have technically been borderline breaking the rules?).  That being said, there is still a fairly strict dress-code. Women must wear long skirts, shirts must have at least a cap sleeve (might be longer in other schools), no bright patterns, MediaKids shirts must be worn twice a week, sandals or sneakers are not permitted. However… I find that certain schools are more relaxed about these rules than others, especially when there are few foreign teachers. Not saying that I broke any of these rules of course……….
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English teachers can be stylish too.

ESL teacher dress code for Thailand example outfit
Long-sleeved, light-coloured flower dress.
In the photo above you can see that I’m wearing a white floral, long-sleeved dress from Zara. The hem of the dress goes just to the top of the knee. There are also slits at the sides, which you can’t see from this angle. I think the dress is a hit because one of the Thai teachers just complimented me on it today!  


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Although it's cute, try to avoid short dresses because they are a pain on the motorbike.


Here is another long-sleeved dress with an abstract pattern from H&M. Although I do love this dress, I would advise against bringing too many long-sleeved dresses, especially in dark colours. Although it can get quite chilly at times, the sun can often strike unexpectedly, turning that cold morning into a fiery hellscape of sweat and discomfiture.


ESL teacher in Thailand wearing a black short-sleeved shirt
Short sleeves are ok.

Cap sleeves are also permitted, as seen in the photo above. I always receive several compliments from the Thai teachers whenever I wear this shirt. I bought it here in Thailand for a very reasonable price and it’s one of my staple pieces for teaching. The lace detailing is conservative but also very breathable for those hot summer days. However, now that we can wear colours again, I’ve jettisoned most of my black and dark-coloured articles of clothing, as they are simply too hot to wear in the sun.


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I love this shirt I bought in Sakon Nakhon city.

This is another shirt I bought in Thailand. The Thai teachers usually compliment me when I wear this shirt as well. I really love the delicate lace detailing on the sleeves. You can find pieces like this at the market in town and the prices are really cheap considering the good quality and craftsmanship. I’m also wearing a flower crown headband to keep my hair out of my face while teaching.


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Looks good from the front, but the sides are too short. :(


Finally, here’s a short-sleeved, black and white vertical-striped t-shirt dress paired with Tom’s and a silver bull skull necklace. I would highly recommend t-shirt dresses for teaching in Thailand provided that the length reaches to your knees. This dress has a side-rising hem which looks longer in the front and shorter on the sides. However, a straight-cut hem is much better because slits or a raised hem on the sides can be really revealing when sitting at your desk or on the motorbike. As always consider the material and choose something light-weight, breathable and comfortable.

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Form-fitted is ok.

          This skirt is very tight (it was on sale for $12, so can you really blame me?!); however, I've worn it many times at the school and never been told that it was "too tight". I wouldn't recommend wearing tight clothes, but if you have a skirt or a blouse that is form-fitting, don't feel like you have to go out and buy something new. I have to give the Thai teachers/dress code credit for allowing body-hugging materials. Of course, size discrimination as well as other forms of body-policing and double-standards may well come into play when it comes to who is "allowed" to wear what. Perhaps I'm just benefiting from "thin privilege" (although I don't consider myself especially skinny at this current point in time). I would like to hope that skin-tight, stretchy materials are permitted for all body sizes, shapes, etc. Thai people do not strike me as being very judgmental; however, you will read in many blogs about how in Thailand appearance is everything, professionalism is paramount, style over substance, etc. All I can tell you is that I've worn this skirt dozens of times without comment from anyone in my workplace. Perhaps more importantly, even if someone dared to tell me it was too tight, I'd be very offended and/or wear it anyway. As far as I'm concerned, if your employer wants to comment on your body, you can comment on a lawsuit. Hello, goodbye. 

          In any case, "professional" dress etiquette around the world is gradually changing to include styles other than traditional matched suits, which are frankly antiquated and patriarchal. I highly recommend this short, yet informative read on the subject of women's business attire through an anthropological lens:

Ritual Costumes and Status Transition: the Female Business Suit as Totemic Emblem


Speaking of rituals, let's take a look at some winter attire!

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X-mas outfit.


          This is what I wore to the school on Christmas Day: black motorcycle boots, a red and black plaid dress I bought in Udon-Thani for 200 baht, a gold belt from the 60 baht store (Thai dollar store), a red Peruvian alpaca scarf and a faux-fur beret (also from the 60 baht store). Although you can't see it, I'm also wearing black stockings, because YES, IT GETS COLD SOMETIMES IN THAILAND! On the way to the school I also had on a thick alpaca sweater and a trench coach; that's how cold it was!

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X-mas outfit avec Santa hat.

         Of course you don't have to dress up for any holidays! I don't usually celebrate X-mas, but it is an interesting cultural phenomenon for the kids to learn about. If you're planning on staying in Thailand during December, you might want to consider bringing a Santa hat or the like. They sell the felt ones here, but the quality is flimsy.

An ESL teacher wearing a Frosty the Snowman costume 

         Or you can just go full X-mas like my coworker and myself, seen here wearing the Frosty the Snowman costume we made with the students for the Christmas concert play. Probably not a versatile looks, but a big hit once a year.


Here's another winter look I wore quite often. I have a light and dark grey reversible poncho.  The light grey side is visible in this photo. I'm wearing the poncho over a light-blue, long-sleeved shirt and a mid-calf length black skirt with black suede high-heel boots. I didn't wear the heels often because as an ESL teacher, I was standing for quite a large portion of the day.
A+

         Something else to consider is unexpected photo ops. My student took this pic of me one day in class and I was delightfully surprised to see that she had used it as part of a homework project I'd given the students! I had no idea she was going to take a picture of me that day, much less print it out! She definitely scored bonus points for that worksheet. My company, and the Thai teachers at the school also take many unexpected photos. I think it has something to do with the late King because he enjoyed photography. At even mundane events you'll sometimes see two or three of the staff taking photos and videos throughout. So make sure whatever you wear, you are comfortable being photographed in!

         One last thing I wanted to mention was: if your company provides you with a uniform, choose a large size shirt. I ordered a medium dress shirt from MediaKids, and it seemed to fit fine, until I realized that the arms were extremely restricting. The shirt sleeves were so awkwardly sewn and tight-fitting on my elbows (despite the body of the shirt being quite comfortable) that I literally had no choice but to slash open the cuffs on the sleeves and re-sew them myself! You can view my terrible sewing job here (the photo was taken in my co-teacher's classroom):

uniform for teaching in Thailand
That's tight.


Some final thoughts about what (not) to wear:

  • Do choose long, flowy, light-coloured, lightweight, breathable, yet covering pieces.
  • Do bring canvas or cloth shoes like Tom’s. They will serve better than dress shoes because they’re more comfortable and not as hot. Plus, if you bring a cheap pair of shoes like canvas slip-ons, you can toss them if you end up with too many souvenirs and not enough luggage space. 
  • Do bring a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Do bring a bikini.
  • Do bring shorts, skirts and sundresses.
  • Do bring a comfortable sweater or two as it does get chilly in winter. 
  • Do bring a fall jacket as you will get cold driving the motorbike at night during the wintertime. I have a pleather motorcycle jacket I usually wear when driving at night. 
  • Do bring one or two pairs of pants at least for your off time. 
  • Do choose fabrics that wick away sweat.
  • Do buy Under Armour. 
  • Do bring a lightweight, light-coloured scarf you can throw over your shoulders or wrap around your waist if you want to enter a temple but your shoulders or knees are exposed.

  • Don’t choose heavy, dark fabrics.
  • Don’t bring thick socks.
  • Don’t bring a suit jacket; you will hardly ever wear it.
  • Don't bring long-sleeved dresses (despite how cute they are).
  • Don't bring short skirts or dresses.
  • Don't bring low-cut tops (just because it's annoying when you have to bend over in front of a bunch of teens).
  • Don't bring items that clash and cannot be mixed-and-matched.
  • Don't feel bad if Thai clothes don't fit you!!!

Try to dress comfortably and remember that the kids don't care what you wear or what you look like as long as you treat them with kindness, respect, patience and humour!

Student drawing of ESL teacher
A student drawing of me! So cute!
I hope this has been a helpful overview of some of the different types of garments that you are allowed and not allowed to wear. Above all, don't let the dress code scare you off. It's not as strict as it sounds at first.


Comments

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Kannika! You're beautiful too!

      Delete
  2. Great Sharing I Like your vision.
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    Life Quotes Please Review and Give FeedBack

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    Replies
    1. Hi! Unfortunately, that link doesn't work!

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  3. Replies
    1. Definitely! You can't wear short skirts at the temples, but you can wear them anywhere else! :D

      Delete
  4. Thanks for sharing
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  5. Nothing wrong with being an individual at all and your wife must have approved or she would not have let you out otherwise.
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    Replies
    1. My wife? 😅 I don't have a wife...

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    2. My wife? 😅 I don't have a wife...

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  6. Thank you! This article was a huge help!

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